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hello!

i'm stephanie

I'm a functional nutritional therapy practitioner, restorative wellness practitioner, certified holistic health coach, and educator. I inspire individuals to take back their health with real food so they can finally get to the root cause of dysfunction and restore wellness within themselves. I reside in Boise, Idaho where I enjoy spending time outdoors, drinking copious amounts of tea, cuddling with cats, and reading good books. 

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Eat Fish Responsibly



If you don't like seafood, give it another shot. Fish is one of the healthiest and most nutrient-dense foods your money can buy. Especially wild-caught cold-water fish such as salmon, sardines, trout, mackerel, and herring, just to name a few. Always opt for wild-caught fish from the sea, river, or lake - never a farm if you can help it. Of course, there are some exceptions, which I will get to later.


Wild-caught seafood is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential fatty acids that our bodies need for good health. You may have heard that fresh ocean fish is a source of mercury. Yes, sometimes this is true depending on the type of fish you consume. Even though I risk mercury exposure when consuming some fish, I still think wild-caught fish is the best option most of the time.


Farmed fish have shown levels of harmful toxins like dioxins, PCBs, antibiotics, and pesticides from runoff into the waters in which they are raised. No thanks. I'll pass. Of course there are some fish farms that don't expose their fish to many toxins. And actually, it could be better to eat fish from certain sustainable farms than from certain toxic areas of the ocean.


To make sure that you're making a good and sustainable choice when it comes to your seafood, look for the Marine Stewardship Council's Certified Sustainable Seafood label.



You can check out their website www.msc.org for more information. I like their guide on sustainable fish to eat.